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As the prevalence of obesity increases, rationing arthritis care is not the answer

  • Author Footnotes
    a Drs Brown and Ravi contributed equally to this manuscript.
    A. Brown
    Footnotes
    a Drs Brown and Ravi contributed equally to this manuscript.
    Affiliations
    Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario
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  • Author Footnotes
    a Drs Brown and Ravi contributed equally to this manuscript.
    B. Ravi
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence and reprint requests to:
    Footnotes
    a Drs Brown and Ravi contributed equally to this manuscript.
    Affiliations
    Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    a Drs Brown and Ravi contributed equally to this manuscript.
      Obesity, defined as a body mass index (BMI) greater than 30, is increasing worldwide. Between 1975 and 2016, the worldwide prevalence of obesity nearly tripled, with around 13% of the world's adult population currently classified as obese
      World Health Organization
      Obesity and overweight.
      . Obesity is associated with increased risk of several systemic conditions, including heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. The associated cost of treating obesity for the USA is expected to increase to $555 billion per year by 2025
      World Obesity Organization
      Calculating the costs of the consequences of obesity.
      .
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        Obesity and overweight.
        (Available from:)
        • World Obesity Organization
        Calculating the costs of the consequences of obesity.
        (Available from:)
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